Chapter 3: References

  1. Gopnik, A. (2010, July 8). How babies think. Scientific American. Retrieved from https://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=how-babies-think

  2. Gopnik, A. (2009). The philosophical baby:What children’s minds tell us about truth, love, and the meaning of life. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

  3. Meltzoff, A. N. (2005). Imitation and other minds: The 'Like Me' hypothesis." In S. Hurley & N. Chater (Eds.), Perspectives on imitation: From cognitive neuroscience to social science (pp. 55–77). Cambridge, MA: MIT.

  4. Penn, H. (2011). Policy rationales for early childhood services. International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy. 5(1), 1–16.

  5. Statistics Canada. CANSIM table 051-0004and catalogue no.91-215-X. Last modified 2011-09-28.

  6. Al-Sahab, B., Lanes, A., Feldman, M. & Tamim, H. (2010, April 8).Prevalence and predictors of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding among Canadian women: A national survey. BMC Pediatrics, 10(20). doi:10.1186/1471-2431-10-20.

  7. Burdette, H. L. & Whitaker, R. C. (2005, September 1). A national study of neighborhood safety, outdoor play, television viewing, and obesity in preschool children. Pediatrics, 116(3), 657–662.

  8. Ibid.

  9. Beck, I. L., McKeown, M. G. & Kucan, L. (2002).Bringing words to life: Robust vocabulary instruction. New York, NY: Guilford.

  10. Biemiller, A. & Slonim, N. (2001). Estimating root word vocabulary growth in normative and advantaged populations: Evidence for a common sequence of vocabulary acquisition. Journal of Educational Psychology, 93, 498–520.

  11. Colley, R. C., Garriguet, D., Janssen, I., Craig, C. L., Clarke, J. & Tremblay, M. S. (2011, March). Physical activity of Canadian children and youth: Accellerameter results from 2007 – 2009 Canadian health measure survey. Health Reports, 22(1), 1–9.

  12. Ibid.

  13. Penn, H. (2011). Policy rationales for early childhood services. International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy. 5(1), 1–16.

  14. Halfon, N. (2009, December 10). The power of building systems. Pediatric Child Health,14(10), 654–655.

  15. NICHD, Early Child Care Research Network. (Ed.). (2005). Child care and child development: Results from the NICHD study of early child care and youth development. New York, NY: The Guildford Press; Roskos, K., & Christie, J. (2004). Examining the play-literacy interface: A critical review and future directions. In E. Zigler, D. Singer, & S. Bishop-Josef (Eds.), Children’s play: The roots of reading (pp. 95-123). Washington, DC: Zero to Three Press.

  16. Feinstein, L., Sabates, R., Sorhaindo, A., Rogers, I., Herrick, D., Northstone, K. & Emmett, P. (2008). Dietary patterns related to attainment: The importance of early eating patterns. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 62, 734–739. doi:10.1136/jech.2007.068213

  17. World Health Organization. (2003). Global strategy for infant and young child feeding. Geneva, CH: World Health Organization and UNICEF.

  18. Iacovou, M. & Sevilla-Sanz, A. (2010). The effect of breastfeeding on children’s cognitive development. Essex, UK: Institute for Social & Economic Research.

  19. Bennett, J. (2005). Curriculum issues in national policy-making. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 13(2), 5–24.

  20. Shonkoff, J. P., & Phillips, D. A. (Eds.). (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; Tabors, P., & Snow, C. (2001). Young bilingual children and early literacy development. In S. Neuman & D. Dickinson (Eds.), Handbook of Early Literacy Research. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

  21. MacNaughton, G. (2006). Respect for diversity: An international review. Working Paper 40. The Hague, NL: Bernard van Leer Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.bernardvanleer.org/Respect_for_diversity_An_international_overview

  22. Trawick-Smith, J. (2010). From playpen to playground: The importance of physical play for the motor development of young children. Reston, VA: Head Start Body Start National Center for Physical Development and Outdoor Play.

  23. Active Healthy Kids Canada. (2011). Don’t let this be the most physical activity our kids get after school. The active healthy kids Canada 2011 report card on physical activity for children and youth. Toronto, ON: Active Healthy Kids Canada.

  24. Sammons, P., Sylva, K., Melhuish, E., Siraj-Blatchford, I., Taggart, B., & Elliot, K. (2004). The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE) project: Technical paper 11 – The continuing effects of pre-school education at age 7 years. London, UK: Institute of Education, University of London; Sylva, K., Melhuish, E., Sammons, P., Siraj-Blatchford, I., & Taggart, B. (2009). Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3 - 11 (EPPE 3 - 11) final report from the primary phase: Pre-school, school, and family influences on children’s development during key stage 2 (age 7 - 11). London, UK: Institute of Education, University of London; Willms, D. (2002).
    Vulnerable children. Edmonton, AB: University of Alberta Press.

  25. Miller, E., & Almon, J. (2009). Crisis in the kindergarten: Why children need to play in school. College Park, MD: Alliance for Childhood; Nabuco, M., & Sylva, K. (1996). The effects of three early childhood curricula in Portugal on children’s progress in first year primary school. London, UK: Institute of Education, University of London.

  26. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2006). Starting Strong II: Early childhood education and care. Paris, FR: OECD Publishing.

  27. Miller, E., & Almon, J. (2009). Crisis in the kindergarten: Why children need to play in school. College Park, MD: Alliance for Childhood.

  28. Graue, E., Clements, M. A., Reynolds, A. J., & Niles, M. D. (2004). More than teacher directed or child initiated: Preschool curriculum type, parent involvement, and children’s outcomes in the Child-Parent Centers. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 12(72), 1–38.

  29. Sylva, K., Melhsuish, E., Sammons, P., Siraj-Blatchford, I., & Taggart, B. (2010). Early childhood matters: Evidence from the effective pre-school and primary education project. New York, NY: Routledge.

  30. Berk, L., & Winsler, A. (1995). Scaffolding children’s learning: Vygotsky and early childhood education. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of the Young Child.

  31. Penn, H. (2010). Quality in early childhood services: An international perspective. London, UK: Open University Press

  32. Corter, C. (in press). Government roles in early childhood education and care in Canada: Patchwork, perils and promise of new directions. In N. Howe and L. Prochner (Eds.),New directions in early childhood education and care in Canada. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto.

  33. Corter, C., Pelletier, J., Janmohamed, Z., Bertrand, J., Arimura, T., Patel, S., . . . Brown, D. (2009). Toronto First Duty Phase 2, 2006-2008: Final research report. Retrieved from http://www.toronto.ca/firstduty/TFD_phase2_final.pdf

  34. Corter, C., & Peters, R. D. (2011). Integrated early childhood services in Canada: Evidence from the Better Beginnings, Better Futures (BBBF) and Toronto First Duty (TFD) projects. In R. E. Tremblay, R. G. Barr, R. D. Peters, & M. Boivin (Eds.), Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development. Montreal, QC: Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development; Pelletier, J. (2011). Lessons from Toronto First Duty and Peel Best Start. In N. Howes & L. Prochner. (2011). New directions in early childhood education and care in Canada. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.

  35. Government of Prince Edward Island. (n.d.). Securing the future for our children: Preschool Excellence Initiative. Charlottetown, PEI: Education and Early Childhood Development. Retrieved from http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/edu_ExcellIniti.pdf

  36. University of New Brunswick Health and Education Research Group. (in press). Smart start case study report: Year 2.

Twitter Facebook